Friday, October 05, 2007

Serious Games Helping Us To Work Sensitively In Times Of Crisis

Serious Games simulating an emergency Point-Of-Dispensing


Via: Serious Games Source - Point-Of-Response Simulator Serves Emergency Response Teams

“You are about to be transported into the middle of a drug dispensing center, with all the distractions of a frightened and confused public. Stay calm and focused as you get as many people through the center as possible.”



Using this game, you can enhance your efforts to teach staff and volunteers to work efficiently and sensitively with the public to maximize throughput in times of crisis

The University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health, CADE and the Chicago Department of Public Health have developed a free game designed to educate organizations in a simulation of emergency point-of-dispensing (POD). A critical element of the Strategic National Stockpile plan is to develop and operate PODs, so emergency medicine and supplies are efficiently distributed to the public in the shortest amount of time. Communities have been doing real-time and tabletop exercises, and the organizations hope to add The POD Game as another tool. The game is designed to enhance efforts to teach staff and volunteers to work efficiently and sensitively with the public to maximize throughput in times of crisis.

The game is set in the middle of a drug dispensing center with all of the distractions of a frightened and confused public. By triaging the public, handing out forms and dispensing medications, players can explore various ways to efficiently move people through the center while maintaining calm and focus.

On the top of the screen is the Rate Meter. This meter indicates how well you are playing the game. If you are directing people correctly at a fast rate, your rate meter will go up. If you make mistakes or move slowly, the rate meter will go down. Try to stay above a rate of 1200 people per hour.




As you quit, finish all of your cases or run out of time, the game will take you to the After Action Report. Besides acknowledging your overall results, you can also challenge back the individual results you’ve got for each unresolved case. This allows you to learn from your mistakes and improve your next round.



Designed to be deployed within organizations, staff can play the game at its website According to the announcements, after-action reports for tracking purposes will soon be printable from the site. The game can also be accessed through the Illinois Public Health Preparedness Center (IPHPC) learning management system , which will allow organizations to register their users, provide them with pre- and post-tests, and custom evaluations.

In addition, fully customized versions of the game can be designed specifically for the needs of individual organizations.